“I envision an Orthodox Christian community, devoted to worshiping God, and living the Gospel in the hope of our Salvation”

Love - Joy - Peace - Patience - Kindness - Goodness - Fidelity - Gentleness - Self-Control





May 24, 2020

Matins and Divine Liturgy
Sunday of the Blind Man

- Deb McDonnell -




Sunday of the Blind Man
Sunday, May 24
Matins
~ 8:30am
Divine Liturgy ~ 9:15am

Service Livestreamed on Facebook and You Tube
Link: All Holy Spirt Facebook Page
Link: All Holy Spirit YouTube

Sunday of the Blind Man
The sixth Sunday of Holy Pascha is observed by the Orthodox Church as the Sunday of the Blind Man. The day commemorates the miracle of Christ healing the man who was blind since birth. The biblical story of this event is found in the Gospel of Saint John 9:1-41.

Biblical Story
The Lord Jesus was coming from the Temple on the Sabbath, when, while walking in the way, He saw the blind man mentioned in today's Gospel. This man had been born thus from his mother's womb, that is, he had been born without eyes (see Saint John Chrysostom, Homily LVI on John; Saint Irenaeus, Against Heresies, Book V:15; and the Second Exorcism of Saint Basil the Great). When the disciples saw this, they asked their Teacher, "Who did sin, this man, or his parents, that he was born blind?" They asked this because when the Lord had healed the paralytic at the Sheep's Pool, He had told him, "Sin no more, lest a worse thing come unto thee" (John 5:14); so they wondered, if sickness was caused by sin, what sin could have been the cause of his being born without eyes. But the Lord answered that this was for the glory of God. Then the God-man spat on the ground and made clay with the spittle. He anointed the eyes of the blind man and said to him, "Go, wash in the Pool of Siloam." Siloam (which means "sent") was a well-known spring in Jerusalem used by the inhabitants for its waters, which flowed to the eastern side of the city and collected in a large pool called "the Pool of Siloam."

When our Lord Jesus Christ, then, came at midday to this city, which is also called Sychar (John 4:5), He was wearied from the journey and the heat. He sat down at this well. After a little while the Samaritan woman mentioned in today's Gospel passage came to draw water. As she conversed at some length with the Lord and heard from Him secret things concerning herself, she believed in Him; through her many other Samaritans also believed.

Therefore, the Savior sent the blind man to this pool that he might wash his eyes, which had been anointed with the clay-not that the pool's water had such power, but that the faith and obedience of the one sent might be made manifest, and that the miracle might become more remarkable and known to all, and leave no room for doubt. Thus, the blind man believed in Jesus' words, obeyed His command, went and washed himself, and returned, no longer blind, but having eyes and seeing. This was the greatest miracle that our Lord had yet worked; as the man healed of his blindness himself testified, "Since time began, never was it heard that any man opened the eyes of one that was born blind," although the Lord had already healed the blind eyes of many. Because he now had eyes, some even doubted that he was the same person (John 9:8-9); and it was still lively in their remembrance when Christ came to the tomb of Lazarus, for they said, "Could not this man, who opened the eyes of the blind man, have caused that even this man should not have died?" Saint John Chrysostom gives a thorough and brilliant exposition of our Lord's meeting with the woman of Samaria, the healing of the paralytic, and the miracle of the blind man in his commentaries on the Gospel of Saint John.

https://www.goarch.org/sunday-of-the-blind-man



Deb McDonnell has been a member of All Holy Spirit, since it's inception June, 2006. Deb worked for the Omaha Public Power District in the Engineering Division from May o...[more]
“I envision an Orthodox Christian community, devoted to worshiping God, and living the Gospel in the hope of our Salvation”

Love - Joy - Peace - Patience - Kindness - Goodness - Fidelity - Gentleness - Self-Control

Sunday Morning Divine Liturgy - 8:30 at St. Nicholas Serbian Orthodox Church - 5050 Harrison Street, Omaha, Nebraska

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Deb McDonnell has been a member of All Holy Spirit, since it's inception June, 2006. Deb worked for the Omaha Public Power District in the Engineering Division from May of 1979, until her retirement in February, 2016, and has a Bachelors Degree in Business Leadership from College of St. Mary, Omaha. Deb assisted her mom, Joan Rakes, in the office for a few months before accepting a position in the office as an Administrative Assistant. Deb is an active in All Holy Spirit's Sunday School, Philoptochos and Choir. Deb and her husband Jim have 3 sons, 1 daughter and 2 grandsons.